113th German Medical Congress: Dresdner Nachrichten

113th German Medical Congress: Dresdner Nachrichten

Confrontation and noise are self-sustaining in the media. It is therefore remarkable that there was widespread coverage of the 113th German Doctor's Day in Dresden even without these ingredients. With the exception of mechanical and emotional dropout in the electronic health card, the discussions in Dresden were objective and constructive. The general topic of the rztetag and the preceding meeting of representatives of the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (KBV) was the question of how good comprehensive medical care can be ensured in view of demographic changes and the worsening shortage of doctors. The first message from Dresden is: This is no longer problem for the future, politicians and doctors agree that the solutions must be found today. Up to now, the Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians has guaranteed outpatient medical care for insured persons of all insurance companies from Aachen to Frankfurt (Oder), from Flensburg to Garmisch. It can no longer fulfill this task if the general practitioner care is handled outside the KV. Politicians have failed to establish clear competition rules for the coexistence of collective and selective agreements. For this reason, the KBV representative assembly once again urged that selective contracts not be allowed as substitute, but as an addition to the collective agreement, in order to test better care models. In addition, the KBV has set itself the goal of realizing the same remuneration for the same treatment nationwide, within five years. This will result in an uneven distribution of any fee increases in the coming years. There is consensus among the delegates of KVs and medical associations that the current planning instruments are not suitable for effectively countering an undersupply in rural regions and in urban social hot spots. They jointly advocate cross-sector analysis of medical needs and the development of morbidity. The doctors unanimously advocate that the KV, Chamber, Hospital Society, State Ministry, health insurers and patient representatives come together to tackle regional supply problems together. The rztetag has confirmed that the resident specialists are not only indispensable, but rather become more important for the care. In this context, it is noteworthy that first the Marburger Bund and then the parliament of the medical profession voted with large majority against the opening of hospitals for outpatient care, as it is legally regulated today. = = "" / src alt images / 3656b10937056b3e1e4fa5b1d7b10e38.png ">
Heinz Stüwe. Editor-in-Chief
Confrontation and noise are self-sustaining in the media. It is therefore remarkable that there was widespread coverage of the 113th German Doctor's Day in Dresden even without these ingredients. With the exception of mechanical and emotional dropout in the electronic health card, the discussions in Dresden were objective and constructive. The general topic of the rztetag and the preceding meeting of representatives of the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (KBV) was the question of how good comprehensive medical care can be ensured in view of demographic changes and the worsening shortage of doctors. The first message from Dresden is: This is no longer problem for the future, politicians and doctors agree that the solutions must be found today. Up to now, the Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians has guaranteed outpatient medical care for insured persons of all insurance companies from Aachen to Frankfurt (Oder), from Flensburg to Garmisch. It can no longer fulfill this task if the general practitioner care is handled outside the KV. Politicians have failed to establish clear competition rules for the coexistence of collective and selective agreements. For this reason, the KBV representative assembly once again urged that selective contracts not be allowed as substitute, but as an addition to the collective agreement, in order to test better care models. In addition, the KBV has set itself the goal of realizing the same remuneration for the same treatment nationwide, within five years. This will result in an uneven distribution of any fee increases in the coming years. There is consensus among the delegates of KVs and medical associations that the current planning instruments are not suitable for effectively countering an undersupply in rural regions and in urban social hot spots. They jointly advocate cross-sector analysis of medical needs and the development of morbidity. The doctors unanimously advocate that the KV, Chamber, Hospital Society, State Ministry, health insurers and patient representatives come together to tackle regional supply problems together. The rztetag has confirmed that the resident specialists are not only indispensable, but rather become more important for the care. In this context, it is noteworthy that first the Marburger Bund and then the parliament of the medical profession voted with large majority against the opening of hospitals for outpatient care, as it is legally regulated today.In the opinion of rztetag, constructive cooperation between resident specialists and hospital specialists is better served if the original goal of the legislature comes back into focus: the supplementation of outpatient care by clinics with highly specialized services, rare diseases and diseases with special course. A concrete proposal for the wording of 116 b SGB V, which provides for the involvement of medical self-administration in the decisions on the opening of clinics and the priority of the personal authorization of hospital doctors over the institutional opening, is available to the politicians. Doctors are already lacking in clinics and practices. That is why the whole bunch of suggestions to make curative activity more attractive for medical graduates was up for discussion in Dresden. The self-administration is requested not only to continue the evaluation of the further training, but also to follow it up with concrete improvements. One of the good news from Dresden is that thorough revision of the (sample) training regulations has been promised. The next wish list is long: medical students should be introduced to the real world of work at an early stage, working hours should be more family-friendly and the management culture in the clinics more collegial. Last but not least, the drug recession with its deterrent effect should fall on those willing to settle. Some things sound like pious wishes. After all, politicians and doctors are now discussing the same issues. Heinz Stwe Editor-in-Chief
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