113th German Doctors' Day from May 11th to 14th, 2010 in Dresden: Public invitation to doctors in Germany

113th German Doctors' Day from May 11th to 14th, 2010 in Dresden: Public invitation to doctors in Germany

Dear colleagues, The government has changed, the problems initially remained. Because the financial resources are limited, although medical progress makes new treatment methods possible and although the demand for services in society of long life is steadily increasing. This contradiction is one of the great social questions for the future of our society. Ultimately, the Federal Government will have to be measured by how seriously it has worked on sustainable solutions. But it is already apparent to those involved in the health care system that health policy is no longer shaped by ideology, but rather that the focus is on dialogue with those involved and affected. We are experiencing new culture of conversation and trust. Doctors are no longer stigmatized with the allegation of the elite. They are receiving recognition from politics again, which does justice to their commitment. Many of our everyday problems can now be discussed from new perspective, be it the cause of the shortage of doctors, the decreasing attractiveness of the medical profession or the de-bureaucratisation in our work. The government promises that the health system should become more humane and more free. Patients should be given more options, and our demand from the last German doctor's day to finally strengthen the freelance work of doctors has also found its way into the coalition agreement. The federal government has announced that it wants to align the medical care structures towards society with long life. The medical profession offers politics to cooperate. At the 113th German Doctors' Day in Dresden, we will therefore discuss the question of how high-quality medical care for the population can be ensured in the long term in an aging society with increasing supply and financing needs. It is essential that the issue of fair distribution in medical care is discussed openly and honestly in view of the limited resources and at the same time increasing use of services. We no longer want to have to end the secret rationing in the doctor-patient relationship. And that's why we have called on politics and society to openly debate prioritization in order to avoid clandestine rationing of services. We doctors reject rationing. We want every patient to get what they really need in the future too. = "=" "" / src alt. images / a65e7f117cff3fa132e4be06c512ce54.png ">
The dome of the Dresden Art Academy. Photos: Angelika Kettenbach
Dear colleagues, The government has changed, the problems initially remained. Because the financial resources are limited, although medical progress makes new treatment methods possible and although the demand for services in society of long life is steadily increasing. This contradiction is one of the great social questions for the future of our society. Ultimately, the Federal Government will have to be measured by how seriously it has worked on sustainable solutions. But it is already apparent to those involved in the health care system that health policy is no longer shaped by ideology, but rather that the focus is on dialogue with those involved and affected. We are experiencing new culture of conversation and trust. Doctors are no longer stigmatized with the allegation of the elite. They are receiving recognition from politics again, which does justice to their commitment. Many of our everyday problems can now be discussed from new perspective, be it the cause of the shortage of doctors, the decreasing attractiveness of the medical profession or the de-bureaucratisation in our work. The government promises that the health system should become more humane and more free. Patients should be given more options, and our demand from the last German doctor's day to finally strengthen the freelance work of doctors has also found its way into the coalition agreement. The federal government has announced that it wants to align the medical care structures towards society with long life. The medical profession offers politics to cooperate. At the 113th German Doctors' Day in Dresden, we will therefore discuss the question of how high-quality medical care for the population can be ensured in the long term in an aging society with increasing supply and financing needs. It is essential that the issue of fair distribution in medical care is discussed openly and honestly in view of the limited resources and at the same time increasing use of services. We no longer want to have to end the secret rationing in the doctor-patient relationship. And that's why we have called on politics and society to openly debate prioritization in order to avoid clandestine rationing of services. We doctors reject rationing. We want every patient to get what they really need in the future too.If policy continues to limit financial resources, ranking of performance needs to be established with all stakeholders so that resources are actually available to those who need them most. The consensus required for this in the pre-political area should be worked out by health council in which doctors, together with ethicists, lawyers, health economists, theologians, social scientists and patient representatives, develop recommendations on what and how to prioritize. The ultimate decision, however, must be politically responsible, because only then will there be the appropriate democratic legitimation. In order to meet the challenges of society with long life, however, further efforts are necessary. The medical profession therefore welcomes the announcement by the government partners that they want to take measures to recruit young people and promote medical students. Likewise, incentives and support for the promotion of settlement options for doctors, especially in underserved areas, as well as an intensified promotion of further training in general medicine should be made possible. In order to make the medical profession more attractive, the freedom and autonomy of the medical profession must also be restored. Above all, however, we have to make the working conditions of doctors more family-friendly. Mountains of hours must be cut and more jobs created in the hospitals. Despite the urgency of these questions, the new government would do well to develop the concepts for overcoming the challenges ahead with the necessary care. However, other problems cannot be postponed, such as the urgently needed amendment to the fee regulations for doctors, for which the German Medical Association has already made proposals. The previous fee must be put on fair, calculatory clean economic basis. It is also long overdue to clarify by the legislature that medical care centers (MVZ) should primarily be in the hands of doctors and only to lesser extent by hospitals. MVZs are not allowed to be speculative objects of capital companies and exclusively profit-oriented investors. The 116 b SGB V of the authorized hospital outpatient clinics must be written, allowing them to take over the outpatient care of certain diseases. While very rare diseases undoubtedly belong in the hands of doctors at specialist clinics, extensive coverage areas should not be assigned to the regulatory area of ​​116 b, as is now the case in some cases. Otherwise, the competition between clinic and practice will not promote quality, but only displace it. In order to avoid such undesirable developments in health policy, the 108th German Medical Conference in Berlin decided to promote health services research for period of six years. The delegates of the 113.If policy continues to limit financial resources, ranking of performance needs to be established with all stakeholders so that resources are actually available to those who need them most. The consensus required for this in the pre-political area should be worked out by health council in which doctors, together with ethicists, lawyers, health economists, theologians, social scientists and patient representatives, develop recommendations on what and how to prioritize. The ultimate decision, however, must be politically responsible, because only then will there be the appropriate democratic legitimation. In order to meet the challenges of society with long life, however, further efforts are necessary. The medical profession therefore welcomes the announcement by the government partners that they want to take measures to recruit young people and promote medical students. Likewise, incentives and support for the promotion of settlement options for doctors, especially in underserved areas, as well as an intensified promotion of further training in general medicine should be made possible. In order to make the medical profession more attractive, the freedom and autonomy of the medical profession must also be restored. Above all, however, we have to make the working conditions of doctors more family-friendly. Mountains of hours must be cut and more jobs created in the hospitals. Despite the urgency of these questions, the new government would do well to develop the concepts for overcoming the challenges ahead with the necessary care. However, other problems cannot be postponed, such as the urgently needed amendment to the fee regulations for doctors, for which the German Medical Association has already made proposals. The previous fee must be put on fair, calculatory clean economic basis. It is also long overdue to clarify by the legislature that medical care centers (MVZ) should primarily be in the hands of doctors and only to lesser extent by hospitals. MVZs are not allowed to be speculative objects of capital companies and exclusively profit-oriented investors. The 116 b SGB V of the authorized hospital outpatient clinics must be written, allowing them to take over the outpatient care of certain diseases. While very rare diseases undoubtedly belong in the hands of doctors at specialist clinics, extensive coverage areas should not be assigned to the regulatory area of ​​116 b, as is now the case in some cases. Otherwise, the competition between clinic and practice will not promote quality, but only displace it. In order to avoid such undesirable developments in health policy, the 108th German Medical Conference in Berlin decided to promote health services research for period of six years. The delegates of the 113.This year, the German rztetages in Dresden are devoted to the topic of health services research in separate agenda item. It is already clear that the medical profession has provided an important initial spark for health services research with its funding program. The Federal Ministry of Research has announced that it intends to support health services research in Germany with EUR 54 million. The medical profession also intends to use scientific methods to identify deficits in continuing medical education in Germany. In the past few months, almost 30,000 doctors have provided information on the situation of continuing education in Germany as part of the evaluation of continuing education project. The rztetag will discuss in detail the results of the survey and the possible consequences. Another focus of the medical parliament is the subject of patient rights, demands on the state and society. The federal government has already announced that it wants to initiate law on patient rights. The medical profession basically supports this initiative. However, we would like to point out that patient rights must above all develop public protective function. This understanding also gives rise to the right to participate in appropriate medical care. In this respect, the government's initiative cannot be about protection law for patients, but rather patient law that summarizes the patient's rights to necessary, adequate and individual treatment and care. In their coalition agreement, the Union and FDP have clearly rejected state centralized health system and announced culture of trust instead of excessive bureaucratic regulations. The doctors will take politics at its word. I hope that on the fringes of the plenary sessions you will find time to visit Dresden's many sights. Dresden Zwinger, Frauenkirche, Residenzschloss and Semperoper, where the opening event of the rztetag takes place, shape the image of the city like many other historical monuments and ensembles. Splendid riverside promenades, baroque streets and colorful trendy districts invite you to take spring walk. If, in addition to the delegates and representatives of medical organizations and associations, as many doctors from all regions of Germany as possible can take part in the 113th German Doctors Day in Dresden, I would be delighted . With best wishes and warm greeting, Your
Prof. Dr. med. Dr. H. c.Jrg-Dietrich Hoppe President of the German Medical Association and the German Medical Conference
Dresden city panorama.This year, the German rztetages in Dresden are devoted to the topic of health services research in separate agenda item. It is already clear that the medical profession has provided an important initial spark for health services research with its funding program. The Federal Ministry of Research has announced that it intends to support health services research in Germany with EUR 54 million. The medical profession also intends to use scientific methods to identify deficits in continuing medical education in Germany. In the past few months, almost 30,000 doctors have provided information on the situation of continuing education in Germany as part of the evaluation of continuing education project. The rztetag will discuss in detail the results of the survey and the possible consequences. Another focus of the medical parliament is the subject of patient rights, demands on the state and society. The federal government has already announced that it wants to initiate law on patient rights. The medical profession basically supports this initiative. However, we would like to point out that patient rights must above all develop public protective function. This understanding also gives rise to the right to participate in appropriate medical care. In this respect, the government's initiative cannot be about protection law for patients, but rather patient law that summarizes the patient's rights to necessary, adequate and individual treatment and care. In their coalition agreement, the Union and FDP have clearly rejected state centralized health system and announced culture of trust instead of excessive bureaucratic regulations. The doctors will take politics at its word. I hope that on the fringes of the plenary sessions you will find time to visit Dresden's many sights. Dresden Zwinger, Frauenkirche, Residenzschloss and Semperoper, where the opening event of the rztetag takes place, shape the image of the city like many other historical monuments and ensembles. Splendid riverside promenades, baroque streets and colorful trendy districts invite you to take spring walk. If, in addition to the delegates and representatives of medical organizations and associations, as many doctors from all regions of Germany as possible can take part in the 113th German Doctors Day in Dresden, I would be delighted . With best wishes and warm greeting, Your
Prof. Dr. med. Dr. H. c.Jrg-Dietrich Hoppe President of the German Medical Association and the German Medical Conference
Dresden city panorama.Photo: Jörg Kuhbandner
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