109th International Women's Day: No more excuses

109th International Women's Day: No more excuses

Every year in March lamentations are sung, similar stanzas with the usual knowledge: women are in the Management levels of authorities, hospitals, research institutions and top bodies of self-government not adequately represented. There are lot of women working in the health professions - but only few of the very well trained doctors, nursing professionals or clinic managers can bring their expertise to run companies, universities or large practices. This circumstance is complained annually on the occasion of the International Women's Day (March 8th) or also on the occasion of the Equal Care Day (February 29th) and the Equal Pay Day (March 17th). In the meantime, however, there is slight ray of hope: Compared to previous years, institutions have to explain why they have not found woman for top job or top position.

There have long been no excuses: An At universities, 70 percent of students are women who still rarely get top job in supplying. The picture is similar in committee work: In chambers and associations of statutory health insurance physicians, the proportion of women on management levels is between ten and 30 percent. This also applies to the quotas for boards of directors of health insurance companies. The latest count of women in top positions in the health care system comes from parliamentary question by the Green politician and doctor Dr. med. Kirsten Kappert-Gonther, who caused stir in February 2019. This was followed by hearing in the German Bundestag in June, albeit without any concrete legislative proposal. In January 2020, Kappert-Gonther asked the federal government again about women in the health care system - the data are not yet available, the answer will come as no surprise. Not much has changed in the past few months. The choice of Dr. med. Susanne Johna at the head of the Marburger Bund stands out.

Another positive, albeit small, step: There is passage in the Fairer-Kassen-competition law that the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Funds now requires 40 percent quota of women on the board of directors. A committee made up of many older men will have to reorganize itself after the next election. The opposition to this plan from the Federal Ministry of Health fell on deaf ears. A possible harbinger that women's quota will also be made compulsory for medical bodies in the future.

Rebecca Beerheide, Head of Political Editing

Every year in March lamentations are sung, similar stanzas with the usual knowledge: women are in the Management levels of authorities, hospitals, research institutions and top bodies of self-government not adequately represented. There are lot of women working in the health professions - but only few of the very well trained doctors, nursing professionals or clinic managers can bring their expertise to run companies, universities or large practices. This circumstance is complained annually on the occasion of the International Women's Day (March 8th) or also on the occasion of the Equal Care Day (February 29th) and the Equal Pay Day (March 17th). In the meantime, however, there is slight ray of hope: Compared to previous years, institutions have to explain why they have not found woman for top job or top position.

There have long been no excuses: An At universities, 70 percent of students are women who still rarely get top job in supplying. The picture is similar in committee work: In chambers and associations of statutory health insurance physicians, the proportion of women on management levels is between ten and 30 percent. This also applies to the quotas for boards of directors of health insurance companies. The latest count of women in top positions in the health care system comes from parliamentary question by the Green politician and doctor Dr. med. Kirsten Kappert-Gonther, who caused stir in February 2019. This was followed by hearing in the German Bundestag in June, albeit without any concrete legislative proposal. In January 2020, Kappert-Gonther asked the federal government again about women in the health care system - the data are not yet available, the answer will come as no surprise. Not much has changed in the past few months. The choice of Dr. med. Susanne Johna at the head of the Marburger Bund stands out.

Another positive, albeit small, step: There is passage in the Fairer-Kassen-competition law that the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Funds now requires 40 percent quota of women on the board of directors. A committee made up of many older men will have to reorganize itself after the next election. The opposition to this plan from the Federal Ministry of Health fell on deaf ears. A possible harbinger that women's quota will also be made compulsory for medical bodies in the future.

The lack of representation of women also has an impact on medical care: It has been known for years that there is large gender bias in many clinical studies. Now this development is also continuing with the creation of data records for the systems of artificial intelligence - with equally fatal consequences ( see page 478 ). Gender medicine, the different "being sick" of women and men, is also still too seldom learned in the faculties ( Page 484 ).

Making many alliances attention to the consequences of too few women in management jobs, the lack of data from patients in studies and the AI ​​as well as the lack of knowledge about gender medicine - starting with the German Association of Doctors via #SheHealth, the “SpitzenfrauenGesundheit” or “HealthCare” Women ”as well as alliances within professional associations such as the General Practitioners Forum. They are making voluntary effort to involve more women experts in the discussions, promoting the temporary but necessary aid of women's quota in the political arena. In general, there is no lack of knowledge gain - there is lack of courage to implement mixed teams, innovative working time models and leave of absence to work in professional committees.

Rebecca Beerheide, Head of Political Editing

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